Disclaimer

BEFORE YOU START: Please note that although I currently volunteer for both the Stroke Association and Age UK, the views expressed in this blog are strictly my own. I am not a spokesperson for either (or, indeed, for any) organisation, and I accept complete responsibility for the views expressed herein. As indicated by the domain name, I am based in the UK and the blog therefore has a UK bias - I've tried to use the Glossary to explain any ambiguous terms, but if you think there is anything I've missed, please message me.

Monday, 1 July 2019

Paradox

It's funny, I happened to be looking at social media last night and saw that somebody had posted about Brexit...again. I for one think that everything to say has already been said, many times over. So much so that I'm in two minds whether to post this. I glossed over the post, but it was vaguely along the lines that Brexit was a bad idea.

Makes me chuckle a bit because surely the time to present such arguments was before the referendum? We subsequently had the referendum, and people made a decision, whether good or bad. So I think that ship has sailed.

I'm always left wondering what the point of these posts are, and whether people have properly thought things though. Are they just to stop Brexit? So, people have specifically voted for X, and in response they get Not X. A bit of a paradox, no? Indeed, we've seen this already with several political parties wanting to ignore the result of one vote, but at the same time saying "vote for us" in the next. I include the Liberals and, I'm afraid, the Greens, in this category. So, in their great wisdom, they've decided that one vote should be ignored, but the other not. That one vote is valid, but the other not. Especially if you're a political party, you should really think long and hard when you decide to pick and choose which decisions you'll observe.

I think that there's a clear principle here, that if people decide something, then the establishment has to carry it out. That's really the crux of the matter - that one vote is equally as valid or as invalid as the next, regardless of subject matter. I deliberately use the word "establishment" rather than "government", although in the case of the EU referendum it happened to be the government. But it applies in General Elections too, where we're talking about changing governments themselves.

The consequence is simple. If you ignore the last vote, why should anybody trust you to uphold the result of the next?

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