Disclaimer

BEFORE YOU START: Please note that although I currently volunteer for both the Stroke Association and Age UK, the views expressed in this blog are strictly my own. I am not a spokesperson for either (or, indeed, for any) organisation. I am based in the UK and the blog therefore has a UK bias - I've tried to use the Glossary to explain any terms which might be ambiguous, but if you think there is anything I've missed, please message me.

Thursday, 23 May 2019

Audible (23 May 2019)

I mentioned the other week about my last Audible read, with some hope for the new one. A report so far...

This one is called Outlander, and I'm only about a third of the way through it. It starts just after WWII, when an English couple are on holiday in the Scottish highlands. She is miraculously transported back in time 200 years, with the highlands full of the old clans and the countryside interspersed with Redcoat forts.

She's a fish out of water, very English in very Scotland, so regarded with suspicion by the Scots although taken to live with a clan. In the Forties, she's meant to have been a war nurse, so has a smattering of French and some healing knowledge. That she has French makes her suspicious to the English too, but that she has nursing makes her a bit useful.

I mean, at that point, it was kind-of interesting. I thought there were a few ways in which the story could go, not least how to use her 20th-century knowledge to try and help people (whilst presumably managing not to be burned at the stake!), trying to explain how she'd got there in the first place. You can imagine that she might have wanted to get back home, but how on earth do you explain "home"? And so on.

But actually the direction that the book has taken is not so interesting, for me anyway. She's taken in by some Scots but is wanted by the English. To try and protect her, she's forced to marry a Scot, After just a month or so. Thereafter, there's a lot of time spent describing the many and varied times they shag as newlyweds. I mean, I was a bit surprised because I tould assume that these sex scenes would titilate a man rather that a woman, and the book was written by a woman. Maybe it is written like that purely because men would appreciate it, and maybe buy the book?

I mean, all of that is harmless enough but it turns the book more into romance than sci-fi. I can obviously handle the sci-fi aspect - hence starting the book in the first place - but I'm not so much interested in the romance. We all have our own experiences of romance so, to me, other people's are not something I'm particularly interested in.

It is a bit more sinister than that though. I don't know whether this is just the story being faithful to the time, but I've picked up on this woman behaving very deferentially to the husband. In the scene I just read, this guy wallops her - that'd be enough for me to walk. I mean, you maybe don't have a choice about the walloping, but you do have a choice about the dynamics of the ongoing relationship. In my world it is very simple - men and women are just 50:50, so I tend to notice when one partner becomes dominant. But as I say, that might just be the author's portrayal of 18th-century Scotland.

No comments:

Post a Comment