Disclaimer

BEFORE YOU START: Please note that although I currently volunteer for both the Stroke Association and Age UK, the views expressed in this blog are strictly my own. I am not a spokesperson for either (or, indeed, for any) organisation, and I accept complete responsibility for the views expressed herein. As indicated by the domain name, I am based in the UK and the blog therefore has a UK bias - I've tried to use the Glossary to explain any ambiguous terms, but if you think there is anything I've missed, please message me.

Monday, 25 February 2019

People's knowledge of diabetes

We went over to see my mother-in-law at the weekend. We also met up with my sister-in-law while we were over there. It was funny that, for both of them, a lot of their knowledge of diabetes was just plain wrong.

I mean, nothing against them. Neither of them has diabetes, certainly not to the extent where they're shoving meds into their body to control their sugar, so why should they be expected to know about something they don't have?

But it was interesting that they have picked up their (mis)knowledge from the media, and a lot of that is just wrong. There is an implicit assumption that diabetes is about sugary food, whereas it is carbs in general. Sure, sugar is carb, but a portion of bread might have every bit as much effect on my sugar. I know, because I measure it. And there's a hereditary link, it's not just down to lifestyle. I know this because much of my father's family have it, too. In fact, I can tolerate a bit of chocolate every now and again, a 50g bar every week or so, and it doesn't raise my  sugar noticeably. Certainly not as much as if I have hot dogs/rolls for lunch.

But it really gets my goat that the media continually spreads this misinformation. I've even argued online with somebody who've said to me, "change your diet and you'll reverse your diabetes". And I can stop taking insulin, just like that. Actually it made me have a stroke, smartass.

No comments:

Post a Comment