Disclaimer

BEFORE YOU START: Please note that although I currently volunteer for both the Stroke Association and Age UK, the views expressed in this blog are strictly my own. I am not a spokesperson for either (or, indeed, for any) organisation, and I accept complete responsibility for the views expressed herein. I've tried to use the Glossary to explain any ambiguous terms, but if you think there is anything I've missed, please message me.

Monday, 7 May 2018

Experiment

A week ago I started a new tablet, empagliflozin. The plan was to introduce the new drug and to take less insulin as a result.
Well, the plan has worked very well. I noticed that my blood sugar was lower almost immediately, and even had a hypo one night last week. So I've reduced my insulin by 10%, from 44 units per dose, to 40. Even now, my sugar has been quite reasonable. I had intended just to look at the average numbers after a couple of months (since I measure myself daily), and reduce my dose accordingly. But I really don't want to be having hypos in the night, so wanted to act more quickly.
So I'm optimistic that this drug will be useful, not least because I'm currently on a low dose, so can go higher. Plus, a side effect is meant to be a reduction in blood pressure, although I haven't tried measuring that yet. The dose I'm taking at the moment is certainly not making me feel faint, which it would if my BP were to go too low. Anyway, hypotension would be a novelty for me -I could just stop taking one of the multitude of meds I'm already taking.

Update: (I'd normally just add a comment, but this addendum might require aditional formatting, which comments don't allow.) On 10 May, I took a series of BP measurements, which were as follows:

Date Time Sys Dia Pulse
10/05/2018 08:18:30 132 75 51
10/05/2018 08:21:11 134 80 45
10/05/2018 08:23:50 134 81 45

which compares to readings like 131/81 on 28th December. So, not much change there then. In the process of doing this, I have also discovered that Omron's blood pressure management software is a pile of dog doo - after setting up the machine with the wrong date, the software wouldn't even allow me to edit the data to give it the correct date! I do think I lucked out with the software when I used to use a Beurer monitor (in fact I still use that software with my glucometer, pus it allows me to add/edit/delete all my data points), although since I now use an Omron BP monitor, it won't import directly into the software. But it might be worth the small hassle of adding stuff manually, to keep using it.

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